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‘We have no choice’ as the State Department refuses to accept new technology for electrical safety

New safety equipment being rolled out across Ireland is being touted as a new lifeline to people who are at risk of electrocution, but experts are questioning whether it will be effective.

The new electric safety equipment will be installed on motor vehicles and trucks and is being rolled into operation by the end of the year in a bid to help save lives.

But Irish government sources have rejected the idea as “bogus”.

“The safety equipment is a bit like putting a safety pin in your finger, and it is not going to save your life,” said an electrician.

The equipment, known as “EPS”, will be fitted to the safety belts on motor cars and trucks, and is intended to give motorists the extra cushion they need to stay on the road.

But electrician John Byrne of the Irish Electric Vehicle Association (IEDVA) said it was a “pile of rubbish”.

“We have absolutely no choice but to use the safety equipment that is being deployed by the State,” he said.

“It is a pile of rubbish.

Mr Byrne said it would be “very difficult” for anyone to get off the road if they were electrocuted, and the equipment is also designed to protect against “deadly force”.”

We have not heard from anyone that has gone through a crash with a motor vehicle, and we have seen that a motorist has died.”

Mr Byrne said it would be “very difficult” for anyone to get off the road if they were electrocuted, and the equipment is also designed to protect against “deadly force”.

The IEDVA said it had contacted the State to ask for assurances the equipment was being installed properly.

“The State has assured us that they are working on a plan to deploy the equipment as quickly as possible, but we have not been given any assurance on that,” said Mr Byrne.

The State’s Department of Transport and Communications did not respond to requests for comment.